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Veli bek Jedigar

Veli bek Jedigar (1897 – 1971) was a soldier of the Imperial Russian Army and officer of both the Azerbaijani Armed Forces, Polish Army in the Second Polish Republic and the Home Army. He served in different armed forces from 1916 until 1946, fighting in both World War One and World War Two. In the interbellum Poland, he was promoted to commandant of the 7th Lublin Uhlan Regiment.

Veli bek Jedigar

Jedigar was born on October 31, 1897 in the real estate of Tekeli, Tiflis Governorate, Russian Empire, in a noble Azerbajiani family. He attended a private gymnasium in Tiflis, graduating in 1915. After graduation, he briefly studied at Kyiv Polytechnic Institute, but changed his mind and joined Tiflis Cadet Corps, in 1916. Soon afterwards, together with Dagestan Cavalry Regiment, Jedigar was transported to the Eastern Front, to fight in the Brusilov Offensive. After its failure, Veli bek Jedigar returned to Kiev, entering Kiev Artillery School. In late 1917 or early 1918, he went to his homeland, to serve in the army of the Azerbaijan Democratic Republic.

Veli bek Jedigar as a young sergeant of the Imperial Russian Army

Following the Red Army invasion of Azerbaijan, Veli bek Jedigar continued fighting against the Bolshevik invaders until March 1921, when he left his homeland, and via Turkey and Romania left for Poland. In November 1922 he was officially accepted into the Polish Army, with the rank of the rittmeister.
In October 1924, Veli bek Jedigar completed cavalry training for officers, at the Cavalry Training Center in Grudziadz, and in January 1925 he was sent to the 10th Mounted Rifles Regiment, stationed in Lancut. His skills were appreciated by the military authorities, and the Azerbajiani soldier was quickly promoted. Furthermore, he was a protege of General Janusz Głuchowski, deputy minister of military affairs and commandant of the 7th Lublin Uhlan Regiment.
In June 1930, Veli bek Jedigar completed the battalion commandant course at the Training Center in Rembertow. In 1932, he completed with distinction the Higher War School in Warsaw, and as a qualified officer, was sent to Baranowicze Cavalry Brigade. In 1934, he was promoted to major, and in 1936, was appointed commandant of the 7th Lublin Uhlan Regiment, stationed in Minsk Mazowiecki.
In the 1930s, Veli bek Jedigar became acquainted with several high-ranking officers of the Polish Army. As a result, he was supportive of the policies of the Sanacja regime (see also Pilsudski’s colone
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Capillaria plica

Capillaria plica

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Nematoda

Class:
Adenophorea

Subclass:
Enoplia

Order:
Trichurida

Family:
Capillariidae

Genus:
Capillaria

Species:
C. plica

Binomial name

Capillaria plica
Rudolphi, 1819

Synonyms

Pearsonema plica

Capillaria plica (dog bladder worm) is a parasitic nematode which is most often found in the urinary bladder, and occasionally in the kidneys, of dogs and foxes.[1] It has also been found in the domestic cat, and various wild mammals.[2][3] Its presence usually produces no clinical symptoms, but in some cases, it leads to hematuria (blood in the urine), cystitis (inflammation of the urinary bladder), or difficulty in urination.

Contents

1 Taxonomy and Description
2 Hosts and distribution
3 Life cycle
4 Prevalence
5 Clinical symptoms
6 Diagnosis and treatment
7 References
8 External links

Taxonomy and Description[edit]
This species was originally described in 1819, and named Capillaria plica. In 1982, the suggestion was made that C. plica be transferred to the genus Pearsonema Freitas & Mendonça 1960, as Pearsonema plica.[4] Currently, both names are used in the literature with roughly equal frequency. For example, searches of the PubMed database performed on 22 Nov 2008 yielded the same number of hits dated 2000 or later using either Capillaria plica or Pearsonema plica.
Hosts and distribution[edit]
Capillaria plica is often found in the urine, urinary bladder or kidneys of dogs and cats in North America, Europe, Asia and Africa. It has also been identified in the urinary bladder and kidneys of several wild mammals in North America and Europe:

American badger (Taxidea taxus; North America)
American mink (Mustela vison; in introduced European populations)
Brown bear (Ursus arctos; Russia)
Coyote (Canis latrans; North America)
European badger (Meles meles; Europe)
European mink (Mustela lutreola; Europe)
Fisher (Martes pennanti; North America)
Lynx (Felis lynx; Lithuania)
Marten (Martes americanus; North America)
Masked shrew (Sorex cinereus; North America)
Northern short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda; North America)
Raccoon (Procyon lotor; North America)
Raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides; Europe)
Red fox (Vulpes vulpes; North America and Europe)
Skunk (Mephitis mephitis; North America)
Wolf (Canis lupus; Europe)

Life cycle[edit]
In dogs and cats, eggs of Capillaria plica are released in the urine of the mammalian definitive host. First sta
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Claudia Dain

This article may rely excessively on sources too closely associated with the subject, potentially preventing the article from being verifiable and neutral. Please help improve it by replacing them with more appropriate citations to reliable, independent, third-party sources. (June 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Claudia Dain

Occupation
novelist

Nationality
American

Period
2000 – present

Genre
Romance

Website

www.claudiadain.com

Claudia Dain is an American author of romance novels. She is a two-time Rita finalist, and a USA Today Bestselling author.

Contents

1 Biography
2 Bibliography

2.1 Regency
2.2 Medieval
2.3 Western
2.4 Colonial America
2.5 Roman Britain

3 References
4 External links

Biography[edit]
Claudia Dain attended the University of Southern California as an English major.[1]
Bibliography[edit]
[2]
Regency[edit]

The Courtesan’s Daughter
The Courtesan’s Secret
Wish List (Anthology)
Private Places (Anthology)
The Courtesan’s Wager
How to Dazzle a Duke
Daring a Duke

Medieval[edit]

The Holding
The Marriage Bed
The Willing Wife
The Temptation
The Fall

Western[edit]

A Kiss to Die For

Colonial America[edit]

Tell Me Lies

Roman Britain[edit]

To Burn

References[edit]

^ “Claudia Dain: About Claudia”. Retrieved 2007-08-28. 
^ “Claudia Dain: Bookshelf”. Retrieved 2007-08-28. 

External links[edit]

Claudia Dain Official Website

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Bhurakoi

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Bhurakoi

town

Country
 India

State
Gujarat

District
Anand

Languages

 • Official
Gujarati, Hindi

Time zone
IST (UTC+5:30)

Vehicle registration
GJ

Website
gujaratindia.com

Bhurakoi is a small town in the Indian State of Gujarat. The town is off the main road connecting the city of Borsad to Tarapur. Nearby towns are Tarapur, Dharmaj, Bochasan, Vadadala. The nearest railways is at Bochasan and the nearest airport is Vadodara Airport.
Total area surrounding including agricultural land is 1000 viga,( 575 acre, 232 hectare ). human population approx 3000 members. life is 100% depending upon agriculture. Main crop includes tobacco(winter), bajra,jawar,dangar(risepulse) are summer and monsoon

This article about a location in Anand district, Gujarat, India is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Sri Lankan cricket team in New Zealand in 2005–06

Sri Lankans in New Zealand in 2005-06

 

 
Sri Lanka
New Zealand

Dates
31 December 2005 – 8 January 2006

Captains
Marvan Atapattu
Stephen Fleming

One Day International series

Results
New Zealand won the 4-match series 3–1

Most runs
Upul Tharanga (103)
Peter Fulton (112)

Most wickets
Chaminda Vaas (12)
Shane Bond (9)

Player of the series

The Sri Lankan cricket team toured New Zealand for cricket matches during the 2005–06 season. Sri Lanka were scheduled to play five one-day international games and three Test matches in the 2004–05 season, beginning their tour on 26 December 2004, but due to the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake which hit the island of Sri Lanka hard, the Sri Lankan team travelled home after the first of the One Day Internationals. The Test matches were rescheduled to April, and the remaining four ODIs were played between 31 December 2005 and 8 January 2006.

Contents

1 2004–05 tour

1.1 First ODI, New Zealand v Sri Lanka, 26 December

2 2005–06 tour

2.1 Squads
2.2 Second ODI, New Zealand v Sri Lanka, 31 December
2.3 Third ODI, New Zealand v Sri Lanka, 3 January
2.4 Fourth ODI, New Zealand v Sri Lanka, 6 January
2.5 Fifth ODI, New Zealand v Sri Lanka, 8 January

3 References

2004–05 tour[edit]
First ODI, New Zealand v Sri Lanka, 26 December[edit]

Sri Lanka
141 (42 ovs)
New Zealand won by seven wickets [1]

TM Dilshan 48 (79)
CL Cairns 4/33 [8]

Eden Park, Auckland, New Zealand
Umpires: BF Bowden (NZ) and PD Parker (Aus)
Man of the Match: SP Fleming (NZ)

New Zealand
144/3 (33 ovs)

SP Fleming 77* (92)
UDU Chandana 1/29 [7]

New Zealand won the first match of the series by seven wickets and with 17 overs to spare. After this match however, due to the difference between New Zealand and Sri Lankan time zone the tsunami hit South East Asian countries, including Sri Lanka; spin bowler Muttiah Muralitharan missed being hit by the tsunami by twenty minutes [2]. Concerns for relatives led the Sri Lankan team to head home [3] [4]. The Test match series was postponed until April.
In place of the Sri Lankan fixtures in the 2004-05 season New Zealand played a composite team, the FICA World XI led by Shane Warne. [5]
The Sri Lankan and New Zealand Cricket boards rescheduled the one day matches for the 2005–06 season.
2005–06 tour[edit]
Sri Lanka were coming off a 1–6 series defeat on tour of India in November, while New Zealand lost 0–4 in their most recent ODI series, in South A
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1896–97 in English football

The 1896–97 season was the 26th season of competitive football in England.

Contents

1 Overview
2 Honours
3 Football League

3.1 First Division
3.2 Second Division

4 References
5 External links

Overview[edit]
Aston Villa became the second team (after Preston North End) to complete “the Double” of winning the Football League Championship and the FA Cup. No other team would complete the double for 64 years.

The Aston Villa team of 1897 that won The Double.

The Cup Final was played on 10 April 1897 between Aston Villa and Everton. At the start of the day, the top of the league table looked thus:[1]

P
W
D
L
F
A
GA
Pts

1
Aston Villa
27
18
5
4
64
38
1.684
41

2
Derby County
26
15
4
7
66
43
1.535
34

3
Sheffield United
28
12
10
6
40
27
1.481
34

4
Preston North End
26
11
10
5
55
37
1.486
32

5
Liverpool
29
12
8
9
46
38
1.211
32

Consequently, with a total of 30 league games to play in the season, only Derby County had any “mathematical” possibility of overtaking Aston Villa to take the title. To do so, they would have needed to take at least seven points from their remaining four games, with Aston Villa losing their remaining three games. In the event, Derby lost 1–0 at Bury and Aston Villa were thus confirmed as League Champions on the same day that they went on to win the Cup. As a result, Villa became the first, and so far, only team to date to achieve the league and cup “double” on the same day.
Honours[edit]

Competition
Winner

First Division
Aston Villa (3*)

Second Division
Notts County

FA Cup
Aston Villa (3)

Home Championship
 Scotland

Notes = Number in parentheses is the times that club has won that honour. * indicates new record for competition
Football League[edit]
Main article: 1896–97 Football League
First Division[edit]
The First Division was won by Aston Villa.

Pos
Club
P
W
D
L
F
A
GA
Pts

1
Aston Villa
30
21
5
4
73
38
1.921
47

2
Sheffield United
30
13
10
7
42
29
1.448
36

3
Derby County
30
16
4
10
70
50
1.400
36

4
Preston North End
30
11
12
7
55
40
1.375
34

5
Liverpool
30
12
9
9
46
38
1.211
33

6
The Wednesday
30
10
11
9
42
37
1.135
31

7
Everton
30
14
3
13
62
57
1.088
31

8
Bolton Wanderers
30
12
6
12
40
43
0.930
30

9
Bury
30
10
10
10
39
44
0.886
30

10
Wolverhampton Wanderers
30
11
6
13
45
41
1.098
28

11
Nottingham Forest
30
9
8
13
44
49
0.898
26

12
West Bromwich Albion
30
10
6
14
33
56
0.589
26

13
Stoke
30
11
3
16
48
59
0.814
25

14
Blackburn Rovers
30
11
3
16
35
62
0.565
25

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Brunnbach (München)

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Brunnbach (München)

Country
Germany

Location
Bavaria

Brunnbach (München) is a river of Bavaria, Germany.
See also[edit]

List of rivers of Bavaria

Coordinates: 48°10′45″N 11°37′34″E / 48.1792°N 11.6261°E / 48.1792; 11.6261

This article related to a river in Bavaria is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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May Bumps 2007

The May Bumps 2007 were a series of rowing races held at Cambridge University from Wednesday 13 June 2007 until Saturday 16 June 2007. The races were run as a bumps race in the series of May Bumps which have been held annually in mid-June in this form since 1887. See May Bumps for the format of the races. In 2007, a total of 168 crews took part (93 men’s crews and 75 women’s crews), with around 1500 participants in total.

Contents

1 Head of the River crews
2 Highest 2nd VIIIs
3 Links to races in other years
4 Bumps Charts
5 The Getting-on Race

5.1 Successful crews

5.1.1 Men
5.1.2 Women

6 References

Head of the River crews[edit]
Caius men started from head station, and rowed-over to retain the headship for the 9th time since 1998, and 6th consecutive year.
Jesus women bumped Pembroke on the first day regain the headship they lost in 2006.
Highest 2nd VIIIs[edit]
1st & 3rd Trinity II bumped Caius II on the 1st day to regain the highest 2nd VIII place that they lost in 2006.
Jesus II were the highest 2nd women’s VIII at the start of the week, and managed to get into the first division – the first time that any women’s 2nd VIII has achieved this since the women’s Mays were rowed in eights in 1990.
Links to races in other years[edit]

Preceding year
Current year
Following year

May Bumps 2006
May Bumps 2007
May Bumps 2008

Lent Bumps 2006
Lent Bumps 2007
Lent Bumps 2008

Bumps Charts[edit]
Below are the bumps charts all 6 men’s and all 5 women’s divisions, with the men’s event on the left and women’s event on the right. The bumps chart represents the progress of every crew over all four days of the racing. To follow the progress of any particular crew, simply find the crew’s name on the left side of the chart and follow the line to the end-of-the-week finishing position on the right of the chart.
Note that this chart may not be displayed correctly if you are using a large font size on your browser. A simple way to check is to see that the first horizontal bold line, marking the boundary between divisions, lies between positions 17 and 18.

Pos
Crew
Men’s Bumps Chart
Crew
Pos
Crew
Women’s Bumps Chart
Crew
Pos

1
Caius

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Patricia Morison performances

Main article: Patricia Morison
This is a chronological listing of Patricia Morison’s major acting credits. It includes her stage, screen, and television work, as well as one of her radio credits.

Contents

1 Credits

1.1 1933–1940
1.2 1941–1950
1.3 1951–1960
1.4 1961–2003
1.5 Other credits

2 Footnotes
3 Sources

Credits[edit]
1933–1940[edit]

Medium
Title
Date
Theatre,
Studio,
or Network
Role
Notes / Other Performers

Stage
Don’t Mind the Rain
1933
Provincetown Playhouse

Morison performed the song “Simple Silly I.”

Stage
Growing Pains
November 23, 1933
Ambassador
Helen
A comedy by Aurania Rouveral. With Johnny Downs, Jean Rouverah, Joan Wheeler, Charles Eaton, Eddie Acuff, Phillipe De Lacy, Georgette McKee (Andrea King). 29 performances.

Stage
Victoria Regina
December 26, 1935
Broadhurst
(Understudy)
A drama by Laurence Housman. With Helen Hayes, Vincent Price. Morison understudied all the women in cast. 517 performances.

Film
Wreckless
1935
Jam Handy Organization
Mary Jane
Martin Griffith

Stage
The Two Bouquets
May 31, 1938
Windsor
Laura Rivers
An operetta by Eleanor and Herbert Farjeon. With Marcy Wescott, Alfred Drake, Winston O’Keefe, Leo G. Carroll, Leslie French. 55 performances.

Film
Persons in Hiding
1939
Paramount
Dorothy Bronson
Lynne Overman, J. Carrol Naish.

Film
I’m from Missouri
1939
Paramount
Mrs. Allison Hamilton aka Rowe
Bob Burns, Gladys George.

Film
The Magnificent Fraud
1939
Paramount
Claire Hill
Lloyd Nolan, Akim Tamiroff.

Film
Untamed
1940
Paramount
Alverna Easter
Ray Milland, Akim Tamiroff, William Frawley. Filmed in Technicolor.

Film
Rangers of Fortune
1940
Paramount
Sharon McCloud
Fred MacMurray, Albert Dekker.

Film
Romance of the Rio Grande
1940
20th Century-Fox
Rosita
Cesar Romero (as the Cisco Kid), Ricardo Cortez, Chris-Pin Martin.

Film
Meet the Stars #1: Chinese Garden Festival
1940
Republic
Herself

1941–1950[edit]

Medium
Title
Date
Theatre,
Studio,
or Network
Role
Notes / Other Performers

Film
The Round Up
1941
Paramount
Janet Allen
Richard Dix, Preston Foster.

Film
One Night in Lisbon
1941
Paramount
Gerry Houston
Fred MacMurray, Madeleine Carroll.

Film
Meet the Stars #6: Stars at Play
1941
Republic
Herself
Jane Withers, Cesar Romero.

Film
Meet the Stars #8: Stars Past and Present
1941
Republic
Herself

Film
Beyond the Blue Horizon
1942
Paramount
Sylvia
Dorothy Lamour. Filmed in Technicolor.

Film
Night in New Orleans
1942
Paramount
Ethel Abbott
Preston Foster, Albe
19곰

Pachythyrium

Pachythyrium

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Fungi

Division:
Ascomycota

Class:
Dothideomycetes

Subclass:
Dothideomycetidae

Order:
Microthyriales

Family:
Microthyriaceae

Genus:
Pachythyrium
G. Arnaud ex Spooner & P.M. Kirk

Type species

Pachythyrium parasiticum
(Fabre) G. Arnaud ex Spooner & P.M. Kirk

Pachythyrium is a genus of fungi in the Microthyriaceae family.[1] This is a monotypic genus, containing the single species Pachythyrium parasiticum.
References[edit]

^ Lumbsch TH, Huhndorf SM. (December 2007). “Outline of Ascomycota – 2007”. Myconet. Chicago, USA: The Field Museum, Department of Botany. 13: 1–58. 

External links[edit]

Index Fungorum

This Dothideomycetes-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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